“Four-On-The-Floor” Rule!

One of the “rules” that I heard upon adopting Bifford was “four-on-the-floor” and all I could think is “what the he!! does that even mean!?” But it makes sense when handling a cerebellar hypoplasia animal and one of the various ways you can ensure their safety!

Cat’s usually have no issues with landing on their feet when they jump down onto the floor but CH pet parents know that this is usually not the case with cerebellar hypoplasia animals.

The rule of thumb “four-on-the-floor” is an effective and friendly reminder to new pet parents, friends & family members to place a CH pet gently onto the ground while properly ensuring all four of their paws are planted firmly on the ground before letting go of them.

Note: This does NOT promise that they will not fall/stumble over but will help ensure they do not fall/stagger from a distance!

Most pet parents (or humans in general!) know that generally cats can jump from a distance onto the ground and land successfully on their feet without issue. This is NOT the case with cerebellar hypoplasia animals and if someone was to let a CH pet jump from a distance this could result in injury to your special baby (or injury to you attempting to catch a falling pet, get caught by a claw etc.!)

“Four-on-the-floor” is a safe, effective and cute way to remember that CH pets need a little assistance when being placed on the floor!

So remember to “PLANT THOSE PAWS” on the ground!

Pet Insurance & CH Pets

We have received lots of messages pertaining to cerebellar hypoplasia pets & pet insurance and unfortunately we have not been able to find a pet insurance that would cover “CH” pets! Below is listed a chart courtesy of DVM360 that shows the top pet insurance companies and breaks down the “dirty details” of each insurance company.

Upon speaking to one of the pet insurance companies “Figo Pet Insurance” I kindly asked them to specify their “pre-existing policy” and how this pertains to cerebellar hypoplasia pets.

“Cerebellar hypoplasia will be considered a pre-existing condition even though the pet is born with it unless it happens to not show signs or symptoms until after the pet has a policy. The earliest you can insure a pet is 8 weeks old and we have a 14 day waiting period for illnesses. In order for the cerebellar hypoplasia to be covered, there would need to not be any signs or symptoms until the pet was at least 10 weeks old…”

I then asked Figo Pet insurance about “accidents or illnesses” [Figo Pet Insurance states that you can still get pet insurance for a CH pet BUT any illnesses/injuries that could be related to CH would NOT be covered by pet insurance] so I asked them to clarify that.


“We base all coverage off of the medical records your veterinarian provides. With CH the coverage will heavily depend on if your veterinarian feels the accident or illness is related to the CH. For example, if your vet states “CH caused pet to fall over and break tooth” it would be considered due to a pre-existing condition. If your vet states that there is a broken tooth and does not consider it due to the pre-existing CH then it could be covered
We could also offer coverage for other accidents or illnesses that your vet deems unrelated to the CH like urinary issues, allergies, diabetes, or cancers…”

So the jury is still out on pet insurance! In our opinion we feel that the pet insurance companies will try to connect any injury/illness to CH (thus the pet insurance not covering the bill for!) so personally we feel it is not worth having your CH baby on pet insurance but always stress to do your homework! If you are looking into insurance for your CH pet contact them directly and ask questions pertaining strictly to cerebellar hypoplasia!

We recommend looking into Care Credit (www.carecredit.com) which is sort of like a credit card that you can only use at the veterinarian’s office (or you can personally use it also! I recently used my care credit at the dentist office!)

Building a Cat Wheelchair

This cat wheelchair is for all the kitty cats out there in the world who are missing one or both of their hind legs, or for those with crippled or paralyzed hind legs. Our goal was to build a wheelchair, for disabled cats, that is just as effective, and more affordable than other wheelchairs on the market. Many cat wheelchairs on the market can cost upwards of one hundred dollars. Ours cost us around twenty dollars.

Materials

  • PVC Pipe
  • Cat Harness
  • PVC Cutter
  • PVC Cement
  • Bolt and washers
  • Wheels
  • Drill Foam
  • Sweatshirt String

Build Steps

  1. First cut two 15 inch pieces of PVC pipe.
  2. Cut PVC pipes to a height of 9 inch (including the 90 degree t-junction)
  3. Connect your pipes to form a U shape
  4. Cut the height pieces to 1.5 inch length and add the new connector pieces for the cat to rest it’s back legs.
  5. Cut axle shield 6 inches
  6. Insert bolts in the hole of the axle and apply necessary amount of washers to those bolts
  7. Drill a small hole into the sides -1/2 in back from front- and dremel the hole to the desired width
  8. Connect axle shield and t-junctions to the U shaped pieces from earlier
  9. Take wheels and screw them onto the bolts
  10. Place cat in harness
  11. Route sweatshirt string through cat harness and run through holes drilled in step 7
  12. Have fun with your little critter and his new found freedom

Black cats shunned for purr-fect selfies

(this is just one of MANY articles you can find online pertaining to the poor chances black cats and dogs receive in shelters & rescues)

Cited: https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-42871851

The founder of a cat rescue shelter has said black cats are being shunned by potential owners because they do not “show well” in selfies.

The RSPCA said it sees more black and black and white cats come into its care than any other colour of feline.

On average it takes at least 10 days longer to re-home a black or black and white cat compared to a ginger one.

Christine Bayka has been running The Moggery for the last 20 years and said while it has always been harder to re-home black cats and kittens, the situation has become worse.

“It’s become more serious now because people live their life on selfies. Black cats are now less popular because they don’t show up well in pictures,” she told the BBC.

“When people ring me in the kitten season they will say ‘any colour except black’.”

Tabbies and greys are “snapped up on day one.”

All 40 of the shelter’s “long termers” are currently black, including Velvet, who has been at the centre for 14 years.

In response, the centre – which is run by volunteers – is offering free neutering for black cats in the Bristol area throughout February.

‘Designer kittens’

Ms Bayka said she has also had people reject round-faced kittens in favour of “pointy noses”.

“People want designer kittens,” she said. “They put an order in now. I find it baffling.”

Ms Bayka said finding a friendly feline should be the “most important thing”.

Meanwhile Twitter users have been quick to defend their feline friends, with many proving just how photogenic darker cats can be. The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites.

RSPCA scientific officer Dr Jane Tyson urged people to look beyond what an animal looks like.

“Their fur colour makes no difference to how much love they have to give,” she said.

Rachel Saunders, the London Cattery Manager at Battersea, agreed.

“Cats are so much more than tools for social media likes – they will become your constant companions and best friends, no matter what colour they are,” she said.

Presentational grey line

Tips for the perfect black cat selfie

A woman sitting on a couch with her black cat and using a smart phone
  1. Arm yourself with suitable cat treats
  2. Choose a minimal background
  3. Find a spot with soft lighting
  4. Get down to cat level (this may involve lying down on the ground for a long time)
  5. Focus on your cat’s eyes

Source: RSPCA, Battersea Dogs and Cats Home

Five “Silent Killers” of Cats

Dr. Justine A. Lee, DVM, www.pethealthnetwork.com

5

When it comes to caring for your cat, I have a few simple recommendations:

  • Maintain a safe environment (keep him indoors)
  • Feed a high quality food (e.g., a meat-based protein)
  • Think about preventive care (e.g., an annual physical examination, laboratory tests, and the appropriate vaccines)
  • Provide lots of affection and exercise

By following these basic tips, you can help keep your four-legged, feline friends healthy–potentially for decades! But as cat guardians, you should also be aware of five “silent” killers in cats. By knowing what the most common silent killers are, you can know what clinical signs to look for. With most of these diseases, the sooner the clinical signs are recognized, the sooner we veterinarians can treat.

1. Chronic kidney disease
One of the top silent killers of cats is chronic kidney disease (CKD) (This is sometimes called chronic renal failure or chronic kidney injury). These terms are all semantically the same, and basically mean that 75% of both the kidneys are ineffective and not working. Clinical signs of CRD include:

  • Excessive drinking
  • Excessive urinating
  • Larger clumps in the litter box
  • Weight loss
  • Bad breath (due to toxins building up in the blood and causing ulcers in the mouth, esophagus, and stomach)
  • Lethargy
  • Hiding

Thankfully, with appropriate management, cats can live with CKD for years (unlike dogs where CKD usually progresses more rapidly). Chronic management may include a low-protein diet, frequent blood work, increasing water intake (e.g., with a water fountain or by feeding a grueled canned food), medications and even fluids under the skin (which many pet guardians do at home, once properly trained).



Tri-colored cat looking up

2. Hyperthyroidism
Hyperthyroidism is an endocrine disease where the thyroid gland produces too much thyroid hormone. This is seen in middle-aged to geriatric cats, and can result in very similar clinical signs to chronic kidney disease including:

  • Excessive thirst
  • Increased water consumption/urination
  • Vomiting/diarrhea
  • Weight loss

However, as hyperthyroidism increases the metabolism of cats, it causes one defining sign: a ravenous appetite despite weight loss. It can also result in:

  • A racing heart rate
  • Severe hypertension (resulting in acute blood loss, neurologic signs, or even a clot or stroke)
  • Secondary organ injury (e.g., a heart murmur or changes to the kidney)

Thankfully, treatment for hyperthyroidism is very effective and includes either a medication (called methimazole, surgical removal of the thyroid glands (less commonly done), a special prescription diet called y/d® Feline Thyroid Health), or I131 radioiodine therapy. With hyperthyroidism, the sooner you treat it, the less potential side effects or organ damage will occur in your cat.



Big cat on couch

3. Diabetes mellitus
Another costly, silent killer that affects cats is diabetes mellitus (DM). As many of our cats are often overweight to obese, they are at a greater risk for DM. With diabetes, the pancreas fails to secrete adequate amounts of insulin (Type I DM) or there is resistance to insulin (Type II DM). Insulin is a natural hormone that drives sugar (i.e., blood glucose) into the cells. As a result of the cells starving for glucose, the body makes more and more glucose, causing hyperglycemia (i.e., a high blood sugar) and many of the clinical signs seen with DM. Common clinical signs for DM are similar to those of Chronic kidney disease and hyperthyroidism and include:

  • Excessive urination and thirst
  • Larger clumps in the litter box
  • An overweight or obese body condition with muscle wasting (especially over the spine or back) or weight loss
  • A decreased or ravenous appetite
  • Lethargy or weakness
  • Vomiting
  • Abnormal breath (e.g., acetone breath)
  • Walking abnormally (e.g., lower to the ground)

Treatment for DM can be costly, as it requires twice-a-day insulin injections that you have to give under the skin. It also requires changes in diet (to a high protein, low carbohydrate diet), frequent blood glucose monitoring, and frequent veterinary visits. With supportive care and chronic management, cats can do reasonably well; however, once diabetic complications develop (e.g., diabetic ketoacidosis, hyperosmolar, hyperglycemic syndrome), DM can be life threatening. 



Ragdoll with flowers

4. Cardiac disease
Heart disease is very frustrating for both cat owners and veterinarians. That’s because, while dogs almost always have a loud heart murmur (i.e., one we can hear with our stethoscope) indicative of heart disease, cats often don’t have a heart murmur present. In fact, it’s estimated that 50% of cats with heart disease have no auscultable heart murmur. Clinical signs of heart disease include:

  • A heart murmur
  • An abnormal heart rhythm (e.g., an abnormal beat and rhythm)
  • A racing heart rate
  • Collapse
  • Passing out (e.g., syncope)
  • Increased respiratory rate
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Blue-tinged gums
  • Open mouth breathing
  • Acute, sudden paralysis (e.g., typically of the hind limbs)
  • Cold, painful hind limbs
  • Sudden pain
  • Sudden lameness
  • Sudden death

Once cardiac disease is diagnosed (typically based on physical exam, chest radiographs, Cardiopet® proBNP Test, and an ultrasound of the heart called an “echocardiogram”), treatment may include emergency care for oxygen therapy, diuretics, blood pressure support, and heart medications. Long-term prognosis is poor, as the heart medication does not cure the heart disease; it prevents cardiac disease from getting worse. The exception is when cardiac disease is caused by hyperthyroidism, which often gets better once the hyperthyroidism is treated!



Bengal laying down

5. Cancer
As dogs and cats live longer, we as veterinarians are seeing more cases of cancer. The most common type of cancer in cats is gastrointestinal cancer, often due to lymphosarcoma. Clinical signs of cancer include:

  • Weight loss
  • Not eating
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Abdominal distension or bloating
  • Weakness
  • Lethargy
  • Hiding
  • Fever
  • Generalized malaise

Once diagnosed, the prognosis for cancer is poor. For this reason, the sooner you notice clinical signs, the sooner diagnosis and treatment may be initiated.
Note that there are other common emergencies that can cause death in cats, including trauma, urinary obstructions, poisonings, and more. When in doubt, to keep your cat safe, follow these 5 simple tips:

  1. Keep your cat indoors to prevent any trauma (e.g., being hit by a car, attacked by a dog, accidentally poisoned, etc.)
  2. Make sure to keep your cat’s weight down – this can help prevent costly problems due to obesity such as diabetes down the line.
  3. Make sure to schedule your annual visit with your veterinarian. This is especially important as we can pick up on physical abnormalities sooner. Note that even if your cat is indoors, she still needs an annual exam; you may be able to skip some of the vaccines (and schedule them to every third year instead) but don’t skip on the exam!
  4. Keep the litter box clean. While this sounds simple, frequent and daily cleaning of the box is a must. Not only will this alert you to life-threatening emergencies like feline urethral obstructions, but it’ll make you aware if your cat is urinating more or less than usual — and help you pick up medical problems sooner!
  5. Seek veterinary attention as soon as you notice any clinical signs – not months after your cat has been urinating and drinking excessively!

When it comes to your cat’s health, make sure you’re aware of these common silent killers. The sooner you notice the signs, the sooner we can run blood work and diagnose the medical problem. The sooner we diagnose the problem, the sooner we can treat it!

If you have any questions or concerns, you should always visit or call your veterinarian — they are your best resource to ensure the health and well-being of your pets.

Veterinary Cannabis & Legalities

DISCLAIMER: Veterinary cannabis is still a very fresh and constantly changing/developing aspect of veterinary medicine. If you ever have questions/concerns, or want to discuss the potential of adding CBD/cannabis to your pet’s medicine protocol and/or treatment plan we always stress to have an open and honest dialog with your veterinarian/specialist! We do not support nor condone veterinary cannabis but simply answering a question that a “President” Bifford supporter e-mailed us earlier in the week. We remove all responsibility for any effects (both positive & negative) that your pet may endure by trying veterinary cannabis!

Cannabis has important interactions with pharmaceutical drugs! If not managed carefully and properly, those interactions have the potential to be dangerous! Working together YOU and YOUR veterinarian can ensure that all medications & supplements work synergistically to reduce side effects and improve overall outcome while meeting your goals for your pet.

Your veterinarian should recommend periodic examination and laboratory evaluation (of both blood & urine) of your pet to ensure that all aspects of the treatment plan are supporting the positive goals that you and your veterinarian have established. We STRESS to have diagnostics accomplished PRIOR to starting veterinary cannabis as CBD has been noted to increase some liver enzymes, and at this time we do not know the significance of these changes. Regular monitoring and diagnostics are also an important part of caring for your pet!

Be aware that the “trial & error” period can take time and may need periodic changes and re-evaluation.

  1. As veterinarians, they are NOT authorized to prescribe any Schedule 1 drugs — including marijuana (products that contain more than 0.3% THC) or other types of cannabis. Since the DEA authorized cannabis as a scheduled 1 drug NO veterinarian can prescribe these products. Pet parents nee to choose a quality product and MUST have accurate information about the amount of THC and other cannabinoids it contains.
  2. With the passage of the 2018 Farm Bill, there is a clear distinction between marijuana (containing >0.3% THC) and hemp (containing <0.3% THC) types of cannabis & veterinarians may have more flexibility when working with hemp-based products. However, there still remain state-specific and even clinic-specific restrictions that the veterinary health care team and you as the pet parent must navigate together.
  3. Cannabis products derived from either hemp or marijuana (in certain states) may be legally obtained by a pet parent in accordance with their state and local laws.
  4. Once purchased, a cannabis product may be administered to an animal by a pet parent — that is YOUR right to decide as your pet’s guardian.
  5. Once you, as the pet parent, have decided to investigate the use of cannabis in your pet, you can then start the conversation with your veterinary health care team to seek guidance and education on product safety as well as administration and monitoring plans.

Starting The Conversation

  1. Make sure to mention the use of cannabis products when asked about your pet’s medical history and/or supplements. This may be something that you mention to the receptionist when first making the appointment or to the staff when checking in. Knowing if cannabis is being used at home helps the veterinarian make important decisions about other medications, supplements & treatment plans.
  2. Ask to work with a veterinarian/veterinary health care team that is “cannabis-knowledgeable”. Not every veterinarian is trained in cannabis topics or is comfortable providing guidance about the use of cannabis in your pet. To make sure that you’re working with the right veterinarian — just ask!
  3. If you already started your pet on a cannabis product prior to your clinic appointment, keep a journal that tracks trends such as appetite, sleep habits & energy levels. This journal can be extremely useful in identifying subtle trends, both positive & negative, associated with the use of cannabis in your pet.

What To Bring To The Appointment

  1. The cannabis product with as much original packaging as possible! The package label can provide essential information about product source and manufacturing, active & inactive ingredients and concentration or strength of the product. Since cannabis laws vary from state to state, make sure to ask your veterinary clinic if you should bring pictures of the packaging instead of the ACTUAL packaging material!
  2. A list of ALL medications & supplements currently being administered to your pet. The list should include all herbal supplements, over-the-counter medications and any special diets. DON’T FORGET about flea/tick & heartworm prevention!
  3. A list of goals for cannabis use. Take some time prior to the appointment to think about why you want to utilize cannabis in your pet- what are your short and long term goals for your pet that you hope to accomplish using cannabis?
  4. Journal — consider bringing pictures and/or videos in addition to your written journal to help explain symptoms observed at home that may not be evident during the appointment.

Want more information on this subject? Visit www.cannabismd.com